About epigenetics and aging of the brain


There’s this fascinating article published in Science that I decided to illustrate. This is my retelling of the story.

epigenetics, aging, mechanisms of aging, Science, brain, mice, associative memory, memory loss, therapy, histone acetylation

epigenetics, aging, mechanisms of aging, Science, brain, mice, associative memory, memory loss, therapy, histone acetylation

epigenetics, aging, mechanisms of aging, Science, brain, mice, associative memory, memory loss, therapy, histone acetylation

epigenetics, aging, mechanisms of aging, Science, brain, mice, associative memory, memory loss, therapy, histone acetylation
epigenetics, aging, mechanisms of aging, Science, brain, mice, associative memory, memory loss, therapy, histone acetylation

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1 Comment

Filed under Article, Mechanisms of aging, Neuroscience

One response to “About epigenetics and aging of the brain

  1. This is nice! I like this!

    Deregulated H4K12 acetylation is weird. H4K12 acetylation is weird. Histone acetylation generally makes chromatin accessible to the transcription-activating machinery, resulting in gene expression. One exception, the acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 12, has been found in regions of silent heterochromatin [1] — meaning that histone acetylation is not always associated with active transcription [2]. Overall, the acetylation state of histones seems to regulate the interconversion of active and repressive chromatin structure [3], but the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of histone acetylation on the state of chromatin is still pretty poorly understood. How do you think this might influence our interpretations of the above illustrated and related studies, if we learned more? And if we did learn more, what might the nature of the most useful data be?

    [1] Braunstein M, Sobel RE, Allis CD, Turner BM, Broach JR: Efficient transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires a heterochromatin histone acetylation pattern. Mol Cell Biol 1996, 16:4349-4356. PubMed Abstract: http://genomebiology.com/pubmed/8754835
    [2] Turner BM, Birley AJ, Lavender J: Histone H4 isoforms acetylated at specific lysine residues define individual chromosomes and chromatin domains in Drosophila polytene nuclei. Cell 1992, 69:375-384. PubMed Abstract: http://genomebiology.com/pubmed/1568251
    [3] Eberharter A, Becker PB: Histone acetylation: a switch between repressive and permissive chromatin. Second in review series on chromatin dynamics. EMBO Rep 2002, 3:224-229. PubMed Abstract: http://genomebiology.com/pubmed/11882541

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