“Magical” regeneration in MRL mice


I just couldn’t walk past this article in PNAS about the miracles that happen to one strain of lab mice – MRL. These guys can fully close ear holes made for labeling purposes in order to mark a mouse for its whole life;  in these animals the holes turn out to be just temporary. The wounds close without scarring, and brand new cartilage, derma, epidermis and hair are formed. And the rest rest of the mice could wear earrings, if only there were any animal jewellery!

Another striking thing is that this feature was noticed 9 years ago, when the same group of researches published a paper telling how MRL mice can heal wounds on their hearts, leaving hardly any scars. As early as in 2001, it was shown that these mice can heal themselves from myocardial infarction after-effects in 60 days. But for some reason the molecular mechanisms underlying these miracles haven’t been studied until now. So, here they are.

MRL mice, mouse, regeneration, regenerative capacity, ear hole closure, scar, p21, DNA damage, p53, G2/M, molecular mechanisms of regeneration, wound healing, healing, regenerative, cell cycle

MRL mice, mouse, regeneration, regenerative capacity, ear hole closure, scar, p21, DNA damage, p53, G2/M, molecular mechanisms of regeneration, wound healing, healing, regenerative, cell cycle


Повреждение ДНК-фокусы-eng

MRL mice, mouse, regeneration, regenerative capacity, ear hole closure, scar, p21, DNA damage, p53, G2/M, molecular mechanisms of regeneration, wound healing, healing, regenerative, cell cycle

MRL mice, mouse, regeneration, regenerative capacity, ear hole closure, scar, p21, DNA damage, p53, G2/M, molecular mechanisms of regeneration, wound healing, healing, regenerative, cell cycle

MRL mice, mouse, regeneration, regenerative capacity, ear hole closure, scar, p21, DNA damage, p53, G2/M, molecular mechanisms of regeneration, wound healing, healing, regenerative, cell cycle

1 Comment

Filed under Article, Mechanisms of aging, Regenerative medicine

One response to ““Magical” regeneration in MRL mice

  1. Glad you liked the concept. Thanks for your article.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s