Biology and Biology of Aging Resources


We have prepared a list of resources that can help understand biology of aging. We tried to find easy to grasp information sources and compiled a list of lectures, audio courses, popular science books and articles on biology in general and biology of aging in particular. The selected resources probably don’t exhaust the whole picture of aging science, but they shed light on the main ideas and research directions in this area.

For those who have never studied biology systematically, we suggest to take a look at the MIT “Introduction to Biology” course.

These lectures are mainly about different aspects of molecular biology, biochemistry anad genetics. Beside that, the course provides understanding how this knowledge can be applied in real life: in gene engineering and molecular medicine.

A good online course «Useful genetics» from Coursera.org addresses genetics and its applications.

One of the lectures from this course is by the way about genetics of aging.

“Frontiers in biomedical engineering” course was presented at Yale University and is available on Youtube.

Additionally you can listen to the audio course on molecular and cell biology from UC Berkeley.

Now let’s talk about biology of aging. For starters you can read a popular science article in National Geographic titled «Longevity». It provides the most general knowledge about the genetic mechanisms that regulate aging. A very detailed description of aging on various levels (from molecular to whole organism) is provided in the books «Biology of Aging» by Roger B. McDonald and «Biology of Aging: Observations and Principles» by Robert Arking. There was a couse at MIT on biology of aging, age-related diseases and potential therapies, “The Biology of Aging: Age-Related Diseases and Interventions”, the website provides the summary. The topics that are mentioned in this course generally depict the main research avenues in biology of aging and the can be used as reference points for self studying.

Moreover, we have put together a list of lectures given by prominent scientists that provide a look at aging from different perspectives. The lecture by Vadim Gladyshev is devoted to the topic of various theories of aging – “Molecular Cause of Aging”.

Noteworthy are the lectured by the leading scientists from Stanford University, Thomas Rando and Anne Brunet  -“Longevity and Aging in Humans”

and by Janko Nikolich-Zugich from Arizona State University – “The Biology of Aging: Why Our Bodies Grow Old”

Nir Barzilai, Director of Aging Research Institute at Albert Einstein College of Medicine gave a lecture on genes, facilitating longevity in humans – “The role of protective genes in the exceptional longevity of humans” by Nir Barzilai .

Konstantin Khrapko talks about the role of mitochondia in aging – “Mitochondrial Genetics of Aging”.

Judy Campisi, professor at the Buck Institute for Research onaging, gave a talk on the relationship of cancer and cell senescence – “Cancer and aging: Rival demons”

Additionally, several lectures are about the aging of the brain – “The Aging Brain: Learning, Memory, and Wisdom,” by John Gabrieli.

and «The Aging of the Brain» by Carol A. Barnes

5 Comments

Filed under Biology of Aging

5 responses to “Biology and Biology of Aging Resources

  1. From the HREF in the HTML source: please eliminate the extra spaces after the “1525”, because the URL doesn’t work now.
    Thanks.

    “Molecular Cause of Aging”

    Very good collection of learning material. Thanks.

  2. Done! And thank you very much!

  3. Milos

    Thank you for this! It’s exactly what I was looking for – the basic biology background for my future bioinformatics master thesis hopefully with the focus on aging🙂

  4. A great source for beginners, thank you…

  5. Thank you very much Ms Konovalenko for the tip on the MIT (free) internet course on biology. It is my belief that the biggest barrier to radical longevity is the mistaken ethical belief that adult augmentative genetic therapy is immoral because the alterations can be passed on to future generations. Until that roadblock can be cleared, we may be stymied.

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