Monthly Archives: December 2014

Cure for Aging Can Be Created Using Directed Evolution

Project description:

Accumulating evidence suggests that microbiota plays an important role in modulating lifespan. This makes possible to use symbiotic bacteria as “living drugs”, which live in the host organism and promote its longevity. We propose to create bacteria, which dramatically extend lifespan of its host. Such bacteria have to produce not one, but a set of longevity-promoting substances with optimal concentrations and dynamics of secretion. To obtain such bacteria we propose to use directed evolution, a process that mimics Darwinian selection on a laboratory scale. This approach has never been applied to drug development before. Directed evolution enables simultaneous modulation of a number of bacterial metabolic pathways andsubsequent selection of the most effective longevity-promoting variants. Experiments will be conducted on a model system consisting of C.elegans and its intestinal symbiont E.coli. Due to highly conserved aging pathways, obtained bacteria may be further used to develop longevity-promoting human drug.

Bacteria E.coli serve as the food source for C.elegans, but at particular stages of the nematode life course they can also exist as intestinal symbionts. Moreover, it was shown that E.coli influence physiology and lifespan of C.elegans. It was revealed that several mutations in E.coli genome increase or vice versa reduce the nematode lifespan.

Symbiont 1

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Filed under Biology of Aging

Main Mistake of Steve Jobs

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I’m quite fed up with the argument against life extension and physical immortality mentioning Steve Jobs who said that “death is very likely the single best invention of life». It’s actually a form of the Buyer’s Stockholm Syndrome, when a person makes a not necessary and expensive purchase and starts to look for arguments that it’s not too bad after all. Only despair and hopelessness make a person justify death. Death is not the single best invention of life, but the worst thing that can happen in it. The whole essence of life is to struggle against death and fight for survival.

Yes, death emphasizes the beauty of life, but it can well do that in a theoretical sense. Like the worst-case scenario that should be avoided. While people are mortal, a human life is a tragedy. Regardless of what a person was doing in life, everything that they lived for will disappear including them. Only striving to immortality and the infinity of goals make sense. Otherwise one can always put the person at a stand by asking the repeating question “why are you doing this?” and regardless of the answer, ask again “and why is this?” If there is no infinity then the person comes to an unavoidable loss of sense.

My answer is that the meaning of my life is in having a tomorrow. I want every tomorrow to have its own tomorrow. Death is when your tomorrow never comes.

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Filed under Arguments