Tag Archives: curing aging

Neverending Sex

2015-07-27 23.05.31Let’s formulate the task of life extension slightly differently. Something like this…How can we extend sex appeal?

Gyms and beauty salons are in charge of this question now. There is some success, but it’s mostly superficial. Plastic surgery only masks, but doesn’t delay the processes of aging.

Expanding sex appeal is a complex task. Its aspects include both beauty and the activity of the brain. To be sexually attractive we have to be smart and fun. One cannot solve the problem of dementia with makeup. 

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Longevity Cookbook Indiegogo Campaign Is the Most Effective Step You Can Take towards Your Longevity

longevity cookbook, health, rejuvenation, aging, cookbook, healthy eating

Something amazing has happened! We have launched our Longevity Cookbook Indiegogo Campaign.

Aging steals away your most valuable resource: time. The Longevity Cookbook is a strategy guide to help you get more time to experience the joy from everything that you like in life. Take yourself on a journey starting with nutrients and exercise regimes that goes on to exploring the usage of genetically modified symbiotic organisms and using gene therapy to boost your own longevity.

Contributing to ‪#LongevityCookbook‬ is the best way you can spend your money, because we are fighting for your life. Please, contribute and share the Longevity Cookbook campaign. Let’s defeat aging together!

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Fighting Death

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The most significant event in a person’s life is death. It changes everything. More precisely, it takes everything that a person had. If he was in love, he no longer is. If he was aspiring to pleasures, there will be none any longer. The world will be gone for the person. Every single neuron will disappear that was responsible for the wishes, desires, and feelings. We don’t realize this, but everything single thing we accomplish, we do so looking in the face of inevitable death. Death takes away the sense of a person’s life.

That little human being that you were once, who looked at the world with eyes wide open, got surprised, laughed, sometimes cried, this human being will cease to exist. Will disappear. Forever.

Death is the triumph of unfairness. It is bloodcurdling that everybody will die. Kids, olds people, adults, women, men. Every person’s life is a tragedy, because it ends bad every time.

Death is so horrible that a man denies the very fact of its existence to protect himself. He simply doesn’t think he is mortal or comes up with a unproven theory that there is no death whatsoever.

The inevitability of death is defined by the fact people age. Therefore, the most rational behavior will be to study aging, and to try to slow it down and stop.

In this picture I am standing in the middle of the hall in the institute where aging will be defeated. When? When there is enough funding. When there are large-scale scientific projects. When a lot of people understand that aging has to be eliminated without proposing any additional requirements. For now the majority of wealthy people approach developing a cure for aging as another investment project.

The desire to make money on defeating death is laughable. It’s the same as when death comes to beg it to come later, and when it asks: “On what conditions?” to answer: “I’d like to make money on it”.

My whole like is devoted to fighting death. I have a very good plan. I only have to implement it.

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Cure for Aging Can Be Created Using Directed Evolution

Project description:

Accumulating evidence suggests that microbiota plays an important role in modulating lifespan. This makes possible to use symbiotic bacteria as “living drugs”, which live in the host organism and promote its longevity. We propose to create bacteria, which dramatically extend lifespan of its host. Such bacteria have to produce not one, but a set of longevity-promoting substances with optimal concentrations and dynamics of secretion. To obtain such bacteria we propose to use directed evolution, a process that mimics Darwinian selection on a laboratory scale. This approach has never been applied to drug development before. Directed evolution enables simultaneous modulation of a number of bacterial metabolic pathways andsubsequent selection of the most effective longevity-promoting variants. Experiments will be conducted on a model system consisting of C.elegans and its intestinal symbiont E.coli. Due to highly conserved aging pathways, obtained bacteria may be further used to develop longevity-promoting human drug.

Bacteria E.coli serve as the food source for C.elegans, but at particular stages of the nematode life course they can also exist as intestinal symbionts. Moreover, it was shown that E.coli influence physiology and lifespan of C.elegans. It was revealed that several mutations in E.coli genome increase or vice versa reduce the nematode lifespan.

Symbiont 1

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Filed under Biology of Aging

Gene Sequencing interview with expert: William Andregg

William Andregg is the CEO and founder of Halcyon Molecular. He invented a technology called “core polymer placement” which offers quicker and cheaper DNA sequencing. Mr. Andregg feels that the cost of complete human genome sequencing will be as low as $1000 as soon as the year 2013!

Here is the interview done by Sander Olson, Internet journalist and creator of nanomagazine.com, a website dedicated to interviews of nanotechnology researchers:

Question: How much does it currently cost to sequence ones genome?

Answer: Depends on what you mean by “sequence ones genome”. If you want a truly complete sequence, you can’t get that now. You could spend millions of dollars and you still wouldn’t have even a single truly complete human genome. There are much cheaper options to get something far less accurate and useful- getting down to about $10,000 currently. But we’re hoping that in five years when people talk about “sequencing ones genome”, they really mean it- really sequencing the whole thing, not just seeing part of it.

Question: How much of the entire human genome have we currently sequenced?

Answer: The most comprehensive reference assembly for the human genome still contains hundreds of gaps as of 2010, with millions and millions of missing bases.

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