Tag Archives: dna sequencing

Gene Sequencing interview with expert: William Andregg

William Andregg is the CEO and founder of Halcyon Molecular. He invented a technology called “core polymer placement” which offers quicker and cheaper DNA sequencing. Mr. Andregg feels that the cost of complete human genome sequencing will be as low as $1000 as soon as the year 2013!

Here is the interview done by Sander Olson, Internet journalist and creator of nanomagazine.com, a website dedicated to interviews of nanotechnology researchers:

Question: How much does it currently cost to sequence ones genome?

Answer: Depends on what you mean by “sequence ones genome”. If you want a truly complete sequence, you can’t get that now. You could spend millions of dollars and you still wouldn’t have even a single truly complete human genome. There are much cheaper options to get something far less accurate and useful- getting down to about $10,000 currently. But we’re hoping that in five years when people talk about “sequencing ones genome”, they really mean it- really sequencing the whole thing, not just seeing part of it.

Question: How much of the entire human genome have we currently sequenced?

Answer: The most comprehensive reference assembly for the human genome still contains hundreds of gaps as of 2010, with millions and millions of missing bases.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under genomics, Uncategorized

Biotechnology Company Receives Grant to Develop Regenerative Membrane for Oral Surgery

Agenta Biotechnologies, Inc., a private biotechnology company, announced that it has received a $1.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health and National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIH/NIDCR) for the further development of a biologically activated membrane to improve soft tissue healing associated with oral surgery.

The firm is exploiting its Customized Therapeutic Proteoglycan Delivery (CTPD) platform to develop proteoglycan-based therapies for tissue regeneration and healing. Agenta claims the technology allows for the precise control and manipulation of proteoglycan DNA sequences for development of products with potential applications in a wide range of regenerative uses including healing bone, cartilage, skin, and spinal discs and as coatings for vascular stents and implants.

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Regenerative medicine