Tag Archives: genome sequencing

9 Obvious Steps to Immortality

maria

1. Use personalized medicine services. Get a lot of data about the state of your own body.

First of all, it’s various “omics”: genome, transcriptome, epigenome, proteome and metabolome. You can do a $100 23andme test, or a half million dollar analysis the way Dr. Michael Snyder from Stanford University did. He was measuring 40,000 his own biological parameters for quite a long while.

2. Participate in clinical trials of geroprotector drug candidates. Several pharmacologic drugs are now known to extend lifespan in animals. The time of human clinical trials has come. Another option for those who doesn’t want to participate themselves is to support such studies financially and organizationally.

3. Personalized science – treat your health as a scientific task. You should identify the existing and potential pathologies in your body and figure out a way to treat and prevent them.

Right now the elements of personalized science are used in treating oncological diseases: people do cancer cell genome sequencing and compare it to the genome of a healthy cell to identify what went wrong and led to the diseases. They also do experiments with the tumor by transplanting it into mice to identify the drugs that may work for the particular patient. This basically means that experiments are done to tackle the problem of a given person. To stay healthy it is a good idea to start fighting those diseases that haven’t yet manifested and try to avoid it.

4. Organize scientific research. Steve Jobs wasn’t treating his cancer during the first several months; he was relying on yoga and meditation. What he should have done was building an institute for bioengineering pancreas and liver and engage in scientific studies. There are a lot of great experiments that need to be organized, for example, studying integrated longevity gene therapy, or one can become a citizen-scientist and build a lab at home and test geroprotector candidates in old mice.

5. Be friends with people with no harmful habits, who are on low calorie diets, physically active and interested in science. Be yourself that way.

6. Create crowdfunding campaigns in the area of longevity. Researchers need a lot of money to do good science. Studies into the phenomenon of life extension and basic mechanisms of aging have paltry funding. We need to advertise the work of scientists that will save millions of lives with the help of crowdfunding platforms.

7. Increase your own competence. Knowledge quite literally extends lifespan. The mechanism of this is not clear yet, but maybe it is due to neurogenesis. New neurons are formed in our brains, but if we don’t use them to form new knowledge, they die. Perhaps it is best to study molecular biology, because this kind of knowledge can be applied to your own health.

8. Sign a cryocontract for neuropreservation and leave as much information about you as possible.

9. Promote the value of human longevity. Public opinion defines government policy. It is necessary to make the government realize the main right of every citizen – the right to live. Aging kills the majority of the people. Various social institutions have to understand this and start solving this problem.

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Why Personalized Cancer Genome Sequencing is a Good Idea

Cancer sequencing

I have just read a very interesting paper on personalized cancer genome sequencing. I think this is a crucial topic in fighting cancer at the moment. There is more and more research data that can be translated into clinic and more and more papers talk about the relevance of personalized oncology. This review is called “Harnessing Massively Parallel sequencing in Personalized head and neck Oncology“. It has a nice picture that explains why it is a good idea to sequence your cancer genome and compare it to the genome of normal tissue. The article gives examples when next generation sequencing provided very useful data to the patients. Anyway, here is the abstract:

Advances in the management of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have not significantly changed the prognosis of this tumor over the past five decades. Molecular heterogeneity of HNSCC and its association with HPV, in addition to the increase in the number of cancers arising in traditionally low-risk patients, are among some of the obstacles to the successful management of this group of tumors. Massively parallel sequencing, otherwise known as next-generation sequencing (NGS), is rapidly changing conventional patient management by providing detailed information about each patient’s genome and transcriptome. Despite major advances in technology and a significant reduction in the cost of sequencing, NGS remains mainly limited to research facilities. In addition, there are only a few published studies that have utilized this technology in HNSCC. This paper aims to report briefly on current commercially available NGS platforms and discuss their clinical applications, ethical considerations, and utilization in personalized patient care, particularly as this relates to head and neck cancer.

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Convincing An Insurance Company To Pay For Sequencing A Child’s DNA

Geneticist Elizabeth Worthey worked on the first-ever treatment of a patient based on DNA sequencing, helping doctors decide to give a bone marrow transplant to a 6-year-old boy who had suffered through more than a hundred operations. Now Worthey, an assistant professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin, is part of a team working to comb through the sequences of five more children.

Every Friday, she and her colleagues at Wisconsin Children’s Hospital meet to go over cases that other doctors have put forward for DNA sequencing. There have been about three dozen requests. An insurance company has even agreed to pay for one of the cases, although the money is not yet in the bank and the hospital will not disclose either the insurer or details about the patient. This is the first time that an insurer is known to have agreed to pay for the sequencing of an entire human genome!

“For some of these kids there is no alternative,” Worthey says, “You either guess, you do nothing, or you do something — in this case, sequence their genome.”

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Gene Sequencing interview with expert: William Andregg

William Andregg is the CEO and founder of Halcyon Molecular. He invented a technology called “core polymer placement” which offers quicker and cheaper DNA sequencing. Mr. Andregg feels that the cost of complete human genome sequencing will be as low as $1000 as soon as the year 2013!

Here is the interview done by Sander Olson, Internet journalist and creator of nanomagazine.com, a website dedicated to interviews of nanotechnology researchers:

Question: How much does it currently cost to sequence ones genome?

Answer: Depends on what you mean by “sequence ones genome”. If you want a truly complete sequence, you can’t get that now. You could spend millions of dollars and you still wouldn’t have even a single truly complete human genome. There are much cheaper options to get something far less accurate and useful- getting down to about $10,000 currently. But we’re hoping that in five years when people talk about “sequencing ones genome”, they really mean it- really sequencing the whole thing, not just seeing part of it.

Question: How much of the entire human genome have we currently sequenced?

Answer: The most comprehensive reference assembly for the human genome still contains hundreds of gaps as of 2010, with millions and millions of missing bases.

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Scientists to Study Ozzy Osbourne’s Genome

Ozzy Osbourne’s genome has been sequenced, in hopes that scientists can figure out how the notoriously self-destructive rocker is still alive.

Although the 61-year-old Osbourne has been sober for several years, Ozzy spent most of his adulthood engaging in behavior typical of a rock star musician. He was heavily into drinking and drugs for 40 years. He broke his neck on a quad bike. He died twice in a chemically induced coma. He walked away from a tour bus accident without a scratch after it was hit by a plane. His immune system was so compromised by his lifestyle he once received a positive HIV test, until it was proved to be a false positive. Yet here he is – Ozzy is alive and well.

Recently, Ozzy became a member of an elite group of people when he had his full genome sequenced. In addition to giving Osbourne information that could help prevent diseases, it is hoped the results will provide insights into the way drugs are absorbed into the body.

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